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Women in Physics and Astronomy

Upcoming Events

Networking Lunch with CSE

December's speaker is Pam Ludford Finnerty, an alumna of the University of Minnesota Department of Computer Science GroupLens research lab. Her research program focused on Human-Computer Interaction, or as she often describes it, “using advanced technology to build intuitive software that people embrace”. After graduation she worked as a consultant in a number of businesses before settling into her current role as a Principal Product Owner at Surescripts.

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Past WiPA Meetings & pictures

2015-2016: meetings | pictures
2014-2015: meetings | pictures
2013-2014: meetings | pictures
2012-2013: meetings | pictures
2011-2012: meetings | pictures
2010-2011: meetings | pictures
2009-2010: meetings | pictures
2008-2009: meetings | pictures
2007-2008: meetings | pictures
2006-2007: meetings | pictures
2005-2006: meetings | pictures
2004-2005: meetings | pictures

WIPA T-shirt

WiPA Tshirt

Links (Funding and Postdocs)

Presentations and Papers by WiPA members

Survival Guide to Graduate School by three graduating students.

The greatest women in science history

AAUW “Why so few?” about Women in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics

Read Meg Urry's article “Diminished by discrimination we scarcely see

American Institute of Physics statistics/reports on women in physics and astronomy

Interested in graduate school? Planning for graduate studies in Physics and related fields is a good resource from the American Association of Physics Teachers

Contact Us

Our Email: wipa@umn.edu

Women In Physics And Astronomy
University of Minnesota Student Group
School of Physics and Astronomy
Tate Laboratory of Physics, 201-06
116 Church St SE
Minneapolis, MN 55455-0112

2017-2018 Officers:

Kate Ciampa (Coordinator)
Fei Chen
Kaylee Ganser
Brenda Knauber
Lis Stolik Valor

Mission Statement

The Women in Physics and Astronomy (WiPA) group was established to raise awareness throughout the entire school of not only the important contributions women have made and continue to make in physics and astronomy, but also about the various mechanisms that make it difficult for women to make those contributions. Planned activities raise the visibility of women within the school and encourage interactions amongst female graduate students, faculty and/or research associates. It is hoped that the Women in Physics and Astronomy group will encourage a respectful climate for women in the school.